When Should You Definitely Take Down Those Holiday Lights?

  • BY Steve Gamel
  • February 6, 2020
By Steve Gamel
469-360-3611

When it comes to the debate over when everyone should have their Christmas lights down and packed away for next year, we’re sure we are preaching to the choir. After all, the majority of folks — even the ones with the most holiday cheer — start taking lights off the house and letting the air out of the inflatable Santa during the first week in January.

So why is it that other people can’t take a hint? You know the ones … the neighbors who leave their lights up until mid-February or even March — as if there’s some sort of mythical award that goes to the one house still celebrating. We’re willing to bet that if you were to stuff the family in the minivan and drive through four or five neighborhoods right now, you’d find at least a handful of houses with holiday lights still hanging from the eaves with pride.

The intent of this article isn’t to be mean-spirited, but as we approach Valentine’s Day and even Spring Break, this is your friendly reminder that it is perfectly acceptable to start taking those lights down. Here are a few practical reasons why:

HOLIDAY LIGHTS AREN’T MEANT TO BE UP YEAR-ROUND
While the idea of having Christmas lights still burning bright could help us all beat the gloominess of winter, they simply aren’t meant to be up year-round. Cords will dry out and crack even if they’re not plugged in, and bulbs and various strands of lights will burn out. Heck, you could run the risk of a fire hazard.

WHO WANTS A HIGH ELECTRICITY BILL YEAR-ROUND?
All that extra lighting costs money, no matter how pedestrian or over-the-top you are with decorating. Most people would prefer to keep that extra expense tied directly to the holiday season, not year-round.

IT’S UNSIGHTLY — AND A TAD ODD
Think of it this way: no one wants to be that one house that has its trash bin out by the curb all week. So why would you do the same with your lights? Even if you don’t intend on plugging them in, the mere sight of seeing them still attached to the house or in your trees and shrubs is just weird.

YOU COULD GET FINED
You could face a steep fine depending on how your Homeowners Association feels about Christmas lights. Some neighborhoods might have rules as to when decorations go up and when they are expected to be taken down. This includes those strands that aren’t even plugged in.

LIGHTS DON’T MATCH YOUR OTHER SEASONAL DECORATIONS
As the seasons change, your interior and exterior decorations will also change, including plants, landscaping, different colors if you choose to paint, etc. Let’s be honest: nothing clashes more than an inflatable set of reindeer set up next to your soon-to-be budding rose bushes.

What do you think about Christmas lights staying up all year? Let us know!

Related Articles